Tag Archives: Eastern Towhee

Monthly Journal – March, 2017

Plants are waking up and everybody’s nesting.  The dawn chorus is especially loud and full of courtship and the claiming of territory.  Frogs are beginning to call at night.  Native bees are busy and there’s plenty in bloom to provide nectar and pollen.  On warmer days the honey bees in the hive on the Nature Trail are active.  No hummingbirds have been seen here yet, although there are reports of sightings close by, and butterflies are still scarce.  This will change soon.

Monthly Journal – February, 2017

Spring has arrived early this year after a mild winter.  Migrants have been here in full force.  Red-winged Blackbirds and American Robins blanketed the neighborhood for days and Sandhill Cranes were seen high overhead.  All that planting you did last year to provide blooms for pollinators in late winter and early spring is now paying off.

Monthly Journal – January, 2017

January was an unseasonably warm month.  Lots of bird activity with many of the usual suspects and one unexpected rare appearance by a Wilson’s Warbler (see our recent January 14 post).  In addition to the photos below we had visits from a Great Blue Heron and a Red-tailed Hawk.  The Northern Flickers in the photo below were engaged in a territorial fencing display, which we have seen one other time.

Monthly Journal – March, 2016

Mild weather continued in March.  It actually felt like Spring as we passed the first official day of the season.  Last month we told you we heard frogs.  This month we’ve been hearing them more and seeing them, as well as lots of tadpoles.

March’s photos include nesting birds, native bees and two butterfly species: Sulfur and Eastern Tiger Swallowtail.  Also both of our native honeysuckle vines are blooming coinciding with the arrival of hummingbirds.  So be on the lookout.

As you can see below, the Cooper’s Hawks are still here.  This one had just caught a Mourning Dove.

Monthly Journal – January, 2016

Again our monthly journal is mostly about birds. In addition to these colorful visitors, we saw many Blue Jays, Red-winged Blackbirds, and Red-tailed Hawks in January.  The weather continues to be unseasonably warm, and we are seeing territorial disputes already beginning;  particularly Eastern Bluebirds, Brown-headed Nuthatches and American Robins.  And we are on the lookout for early hummingbird arrivals.